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How much sleep is healthy for you?

by seca-us

Sufficient sleep is essential for good health. And yet, our modern lifestyles are causing us to sleep poorly, and far too little. Chronic sleep deprivation and sleep disorders are suspected to facilitate the development of obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, thus increasing the risk of heart attacks and strokes. Therefore, according to current recommendations, adults should sleep for seven to nine hours a day. At the same time, the question arises as to whether longer sleep is automatically healthier.

Exercising - an ally against dementia

by seca-us

The first signs of dementia can be increased forgetfulness, repetition of the same questions or even confusing the time or day. Especially in its early stages, the symptoms are subtle and often interpreted as normal signs of aging, by those affected and their loved ones.

The traffic light rating of food - a remedy for obesity?

by seca-us

Many people are unaware of how unhealthy their regular groceries can be. Unbeknownst to them, they consume tons of sugar, salt and fat, which are hidden as cheap flavor enhancers in many industrially processed products.

Does the Keto diet really work?

by seca-us

A lot of people highly value a slim waist and a healthy diet. For this reason, new food trends and alternative diets are becoming more and more popular. As soon as Spring starts, the media releases numerous articles about new "Superfoods" and "miracle diets" - always promising easy and long-lasting weight loss, as well as positive side effects for our health. Yet the example of the popular "Atkins diet" from a few years ago reminds us that dietary trends should always be scrutinized.

Cancer from sausages, steaks and charcoal?

by seca-us

According to the calendar, the solstice on June 21 officially marks the beginning of Summer - and with it comes the season of outdoor barbecues. Few activities are as strongly associated with Summer as the act of outdoor grilling with friends and family. With the use of an open fire, food has a unique taste that has a great appeal to many. This experienced taste is based on a non-enzymatic browning reaction known as the Maillard reaction. When heated, amino acids and reducing sugars (such as glucose or fructose) react with one another and form a new chemical compound which is responsible for the characteristic taste, smell and the appearance of grilled or fried food. However, this reaction also has a darker side to it. At temperatures above 130°C, so-called engl. heterocyclic aromatic amines (HCAs) may be formed within the muscle fibers. This group of substances is partially responsible for dampening the enjoyment of barbecues in recent years because, as studies have revealed, the regular consumption of grilled meat is associated with a high risk of cancer.

Running at freezing temperatures?

by seca-us

Is it actually healthy to go jogging in freezing temperatures? Many ambitious runners ask themselves this very question during the colder seasons. Generally, regular cardio exercise has proven to be positive for our health. Especially the cardiovascular and immune system, the metabolism and our general condition benefits from exercising. So darkness and freezing temperatures should not be used as excuses to not work-out. Still, there are a few important things Winter joggers should consider: Running in temperatures of up to 14 - 5° F should not be a problem. The fear that the cold might damage the lungs is unfounded. After all, skiers, snowboarders and biathletes are capable of performing even at far lower temperatures, without it being detrimental to their health.

Slim with “slimmers”: how effective are they really?

by seca-us

Most of us like the idea of having a slim figure and strive to attain the beauty standards we are constantly exposed to in the media. But with the excess of available food in many western countries, it’s difficult for us to overcome our fundamental human instincts. We tend to consume excessive amounts of sugary and fatty foods, often in conjunction with a sedentary lifestyle. This imbalance between dietary intake and calories burned often results in weight issues, such as obesity, which come with their own set of negative health consequences. It is extremely difficult for many people to consciously change their dietary habits and lifestyle. This problem has created a huge market for diet products that promise an easy weight loss within a very short time. But how effective are these “slimmers” really?

Does constant availability in our job make us sick?

by seca-us

In a world of modern technologies, the boundaries between work and leisure are becoming increasingly blurred. Thus, almost 20% of 30 to 44 year olds no longer manage to escape from the daily routines of their professions during their vacation. At least once a week, a quarter of all employees read or reply to work-related e-mails outside of their regular working hours. On average, this amounts to 26 minutes of unpaid work. According to surveys conducted by Northern Illinois University, this diminishes the recreational value of leisure time and is seen as a burden by many workers. Because of this, some companies now switch off their servers during the weekend. But does our constant availability really lead to an increase in physical and mental illness, such as depression and exhaustion?

How our psyche influences our nutrition (part 2)

by seca-us

When the weather is cold and uncomfortable, staying in for a movie night on the couch seems more appealing than jogging outside through the park. On top of that, temptation comes in the form of chocolate or chips, completing our cozy evening at home. But why do we have such an appetite for fatty or sweet foods?